Pioneer Pens

ENG 1023, Texas Woman's University (Fall 2012)

Practicing Annotation

Before class on Thursday, October 18th, write an annotation of “A Day Without Feminism”, and post it to the blog before class time. We will use these in class to practice improving our annotation skills.

Be sure to make use of the resources on citation and annotation, and make sure you take all the required steps: Cite the source, then summarize, evaluate, AND reflect.

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39 comments on “Practicing Annotation

  1. Hannah Stafford
    October 17, 2012

    Baumgartner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism,” Manifesta:
    Young Women, Feminism, and the Future” (New York: Farrer, Straus, and
    Giroux) 2000: 3-9; 1-3.

    In this article both Baumgartner and Richards analyze how life would be “if the women’s movement had never happened and the conditions for women had remained as they were in the years of [their] births” (Baumgartner, Richards 1). The article continues on and remarks that if things had not changed the “Whirlpool gas stove” would be called “Mrs. America,” “babies” born without a “father’s name” would have “’illegitimate’ typed on the birth certificate” (Baumgartner, Richards 1) Also, there would be “no child-care centers” for working moms (Baumgartner, Richards 1). Boys in school would take “shop” class and girls would take “home ec.” (Baumgartner, Richards 1). Girls would read “Nancy Drew” and boys would read “the Hardy Boys” (Baumgartner, Richards 1). Girls would not “have any varsity sport teams;” all they would have is “cheerleading or being a drum majorette” (Baumgartner, Richards 1). The article goes on to say that women would not have access to birth control, and abortions would be costly or “illegal” (Baumgartner, Richards 1). The “Miss America Pageant” would still be the “biggest source of scholarship money for women” (Baumgartner, Richards 2). Additionally, most colleges would be closed to women like “Harvard” University and “West Point,” and women would only be admitted to “girls schools” (Baumgartner, Richards 2). There would only be about “ 2 percent women in the military, and these women [would be] mostly nurses” (Baumgartner, Richards 2). Also, “women workers” could be “fired or demoted for being pregnant” (Baumgartner, Richards 2). A woman would be “refused service” at a “restaurant or a bar” if she was “without a male escort” (Baumgartner, Richards 2-3). The authors note that the “women’s health movement” would not exist (Baumgartner, Richards 3). The article closes with mentioning, “the world we inhabit barely resembles the world we were born into. And there’s still a lot left to do” (Baumgartner, Richards 3).
    In this article, both authors do an excellent job of noting all the differences for women from the 1970s to modern days. This source could be very helpful in writing a piece about the women’s movement and feminism because it goes into great detail about all the areas of life that would be different like women’s jobs, health, and their rights (Baumgartner, Richards 1-3). The authors seem very knowledgeable about the past of women. While the source may seem biased in the sense that it is written by two women, the women write about facts, which gives credibility to their argument for feminism. The goal of this source is quite clear – to show the necessity of feminism, and the fact that there is still more to do in the future to benefit both men and women (Baumgartner, Richards 1-3).
    Overall, this source is very helpful. If I were writing a paper about feminism, I would most definitely want to include this source because it is a wealth of information. It discusses all the different areas of life and shows explicitly how things would be different if there was no women’s movement (Baumgartner, Richards 1-3). The article, “A Day Without Feminism,” has changed how I feel about feminism. I used to think that feminism was for those who thought women were better than men, but this article shows that feminism is more of a way to help women become more equal to men and not better than them (Baumgartner, Richards 1-3).

    * I used a citation for this article that I found online since there was not enough information on the PDF to make a full citation.

  2. Jourdan Esquenazi
    October 17, 2012

    Jourdan Esquenazi: T/TR 1-2:20
    (I used an online source for citation: Google Books)

    Baumgardner, Jennifer, and Amy Richards. “Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future.” Google Books. Macmillian, 2000. Web. 17 Oct. 2012. .

    In the article “A Day Without Feminism” the authors Boumgoidnei and Richntds ask the reader to place themselves into the lives of women during their birth year of 1970. They want to exemplify how feminism has changed from earlier years and “how important feminism is to people’s lives – men’s and women’s” (Baumgardner, Richards 1). The authors thoroughly give examples of tasks that a woman would complete on an everyday basis to demonstrate how significant and unfair the simple differences were back then compared to now. For example, upon waking up, the mother already must take care of the small children all day due to the lacking of “child-care centers” or must pay “a baby sitter or expensive nursery school” if they are fortunate enough to leave the house because it’s too “unnatural” for men to watch the young children (Baumgardner, Richards 1). While at home, their only sense of entertainment, other than caring for their children, is to watch “Sly and the family Stone” or clean their stereotypical “Whirlpool gas stove named Mrs. America” to prepare a grand feast for their hardworking husbands (Baumgardner, Richards 1). Prior to even becoming a mother, young women in school are already predestined to be housemothers and take care of all of their future husband-to-be needs or work a low-income career based on their sex appeal. In school the only option of courses available for them to take is “home ec” where they learn all of the necessary skills to stay at home and do nothing but cook and clean for their men. Also at a young age women are introduced to dangerous “high-dose birth-control to prevent pregnancy if they’re sexual active which was granted to them by uninformative doctors” (Baumgardner, Richards 1). This transitional stage in their sexual maturity however lacks the education needs and information that is available in current time. The idea of “masturbation as a natural activity” or magazines like Seventeen that in current time are chalked full of information about sex are rarely brought to light or even mentioned during this time period (Baumgardner, Richards 1). Once the women finally reach adulthood, if they’re fortunate enough to be working independently outside the home, most of their career opportunities will be granted to them due to their physical appearance rather than their educational qualifications. For example, as “stewardesses, sex appeal is a job requirement, wearing makeup is a rule and women are fired is they exceed the age or weight deemed sexy” (Baumgardner, Richards 2). Overall there is no equality among men and women during this era that is why the impact and push for a strong feministic movement was necessary. It is also relevant to today’s time because several of the setbacks for women during the 1970s are still evident now. An example of this would be that “women are still not allowed to be Catholic priests and that when deciding custody of children between parents, the father is 60 to 80 percent more likely to win” (Baumgardner, Richards 2). Overall the idea of the perfect woman or wife during the 1970s was unfair and clearly beneficial only to men. Without the feminist movements and push towards equality, even more of the same scenarios would be occurring today, or worse.

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading this article and learning more about the history of women. The authors did a fabulous job in the way that they organized their information and included as much as they did. It was obvious that there was a personal bias in the reading selection and that they were angry about the way that things used to be. However upon concluding the article, I could not help but feel shocked myself about how low of a status women were compared to the men and that they virtually had no rights or voice in anything. It’s interesting to see how things have changed and not at the same time. I would definitely use this source or at least read this article again since it is full of useful and interesting information.

  3. Stephen
    October 17, 2012

    Baumgartner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism,” Manifesta:
    Young Women, Feminism, and the Future” (New York: Farrer, Straus, and
    Giroux) 2000: 3-9; 1-3.

    “A Day Without Feminism”(Manifesta) was well written and address the audience, mostly women, because a man wouldn’t be caught reading it. Being male, I wouldn’t have read it if it had not been an assignment. The thoughts of where America would be without the effects of feminism are quite boring and honestly kind of scary. To think there is no place to go for a woman of abuse and the thought that a woman should stay in abusive relationship is frightening. A woman must be escorted by a man to go out to a restaurant or bar or that college women had a curfew.
    The piece was interesting and caught my attention on several points and the changes due to feminism are enlightening.

  4. Silvia Saldana
    October 17, 2012

    Silvia Saldana (T/Th 1pm-2:20)

    Baumgardner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism”, Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future”.(New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux) 2000: 1-3.

    The article “A Day without Feminism” makes a very interesting point that if feminism did not exist, women and men would probably not have the same rights they do today. The authors introduce us to their purpose of this article by stating, “Is feminism dead? […] For us, the only way to answer these questions is to imagine what our lives would have been if the women’s movement had never happed […]” (Baumgardner, Richards 1). This quote not only prepares the reader to be able to think as if they were still in the 1970’s, but it also demonstrates in what perspective the article will be presented as a whole. The authors give various examples of jobs, education, individuality, activities, and hobbies that were limited to or of excess to both genders, but primarily for females. For instance, “Girls have physical-education class and play half-court basketball, but not soccer, track, or cross country; nor do they have any varsity sports teams. The only prestigious physical activity for girls is cheerleading, or being a drum majorette.” (Baumgardner, Richards 1). In comparison with today’s sports teams, girls are allowed to be able to play any other sport that is “considered” for women. Of course, there is still controversy about girls playing in an “all guys” sport such as football even in schools. This is one of the many different examples the authors provided throughout their writing.
    This article was beyond informative; it really catches the readers’ attention and intrigues them into wanting to know more about the subject, at least it had that effect on me. It is reliable because it offers several facts and includes references of magazines, events, etc. still known today. The main goal is to explain and give detailed reasons as to why feminism is still important even on this day.

  5. Ashley Morton
    October 17, 2012

    Ashley Morton (T/Th 11:00)

    *I cited this source based solely on the information that was given in the PDF document.

    Baumgartner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism.” Web. 17 Oct. 2012.

    In this article, the authors take the reader through the typical day of life before the feminist movement occurred. Their goal is to demonstrate to the reader how much the movement has advanced society and get the reader to question whether or not these advancements are enough. The writers use many different types of examples to open the reader’s eyes to the changes and opportunities that are available today that weren’t available back then. Some common examples used are those of female and male inequality both in the workforce and in everyday life. For instance, “a woman either has to quit or succumb” to the advances of her employer” because there were no laws in the workforce to protect a woman from sexual harassment (Baumgartner, Richards). Also, “women were not to “worry their pretty little heads” but instead focus on “keeping their little heads pretty” (Baumgartner, Richards). The authors also tie some of these models back into modern day by using comparison and contrast. Such a case occurs during the discussion of divorce rates; although it is quite common today for media to “blam[e] the woman’s movement for divorce,” in reality, marriage in the 1970’s ended at the same rate as marriages at the turn of the century (Baumgartner, Richards).

    Overall, this source is very informative. A lot of the examples are common knowledge to the public, as students learn about many of these circumstances through history and women’s studies courses. Still, the authors do a good job of providing the reader with new cases to explore. The information is reliable despite the tiny amount of bias that can be seen in the authors’ diction and commentary. One such example of this bias is present in the discussion of how women are loose after getting a divorce. The authors show their attitudes towards this thinking when write “after all, she had sex with one guy, so why not all guys?” (Baumgartner, Richards). Despite this prejudice, I would definitely use this document as a source in a paper. It would provide good evidence in an essay about how the feminist movement has shaped modern society. Specifically, the authors’ bias could be worth examining in a paper regarding people’s attitudes towards the feminist movement and whether they think the movement was effective or not. After reading this article, I am in agreement with its writers. We do still have a long way to go in the quest for women’s equality in society.

  6. Maritza Mauricio
    October 17, 2012

    Maritza Mauricio
    T/TH (9.30)

    Baumgartner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism,” Manifesta:
    Young Women, Feminism, and the Future” (New York: Farrer, Straus, and
    Giroux) 2000: 3-9; 1-3.

    The reading “A Day Without feminism” is about how people used to live. It also talks about what rights did women had. For example, it states that, “If a pregnancy happens, an enterprising gal can get a legal abortion only if she lives in New York or is rich enough to fly there, or to Cuba, London, or Scandinavia.” What I think about this is that it is not fair for those women who can’t afford to get a legal abortion. I think every women should have a choice without worrying if you have enough money. It also talked about how women and men were treated differently. For example guys could stay out late as they want. And women could not work at an airline pilot. And if women did not get makeup on it means that they were probably lesbians. And young girls also got pregnant at a young age.
    I believe that it not right to start judging people without knowing them or knowing their history first. I also believe that they should of make it easier for the women that could not afford an abortion. I find this reading interesting and good information. I think I learned a lot of things that happened back then that I did not know about. I really enjoying reading this reading.

  7. Selene Chavez
    October 17, 2012

    Selene Chavez
    T/TH (9:30 am)

    Baumgartner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism,” Manifesta:
    Young Women, Feminism, and the Future” (New York: Farrer, Straus, and
    Giroux) 2000: 3-9; 1-3.

    The article “A Day without Feminism” is a really interesting reading because it talks about how the authors are trying to make a point of how life was before the feminist movement started. They give many examples concerning sports, education, jobs, and marriage life, pregnancy. For example for jobs it states that, “If the bosses demand to have sex with the employees, the employee has no choice but to please him or quit the job.” What I think about this is that it is really depressing to know how women were being taken advantage of, and the things they would do to keep their jobs because it was the only way they could survive. Another example concerning pregnancy is “if a girl “gets herself pregnant,” she loses her membership in the Nation Honor Society (which is still true today) and is expelled.” I think this quote is a matter of exaggeration because I think that by being kicked out is just too much. I think women who are pregnant shouldn’t be treated as if they committed a crime. It is something that many people still think today. What I think about this article is that it was really informative. I also think that the main goal of this reading was to explain how women and men especially women were treated and how feminism is still important today in society.

  8. Tiffany Lightner
    October 17, 2012

    Tiffany Lightner
    T/TH 1:00pm-2:00pm

    Annotated Bibliography
    A Day without Feminism
    Jennifer Baumgardner & Amy Richards

    Baumgardner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism”, Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future”. (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux) 2000: 1-3.

    Born in the year of 1970, both Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards take the time to reflect and reminisce on the life and mentality of the woman living in that time period; they also sporadically compare the woman’s progression of rights and role from then to now. Baumgardner and Richards provide hefty examples of some of the stupefied expectations of women in the 1970’s such as: the idea that sex was not to be that of pleasure or a sign of love between a husband and wife but for the reasons of “procreation” only (Baumgardner, Richards, 2000), the limitations on studies available to women in not just high school but on all levels of educational succession, curfews-mandated to women only, mandatory vanity, housekeeping, lack of independence, and many other things that seemed to be absolutely absurd. The authors were able to vividly describe the atmosphere inside the homes and workplaces of women with the conglomeration of adjectives and emotion and through personal anecdotes. This story is a great source for those who desire the knowledge of life for a woman before feminism began its’ journey to this present day. It will take you to that time and place and you will feel the rage of that secretary who has had enough of her male boss making unsolicited sexual advances toward her; you will feel the utter sense of hopelessness of the wife that is continuously abused by her husband, but has no support system to rescue herself to-due to her gender and role as the “wife”. Within all of these words of disbelief, heard by virgin ears; your roaring anger is eventually deflated because of their acknowledgment of where feminism has ultimately led them and others like them. They do not deny the victory of today and are proud of the leaps and bounds that women have made, they pledge allegiance to the mighty fist of feminism and welcome the future of “her”; “still a lot left to do” (Baumgardner, Richards, 2000)

  9. Mayte R.
    October 18, 2012

    Mayte Ramirez (TTH 11am)
    I cited this reading using only what was given on the PDF file.

    Boumgoidnei, Jennifer and Richntds, Amy. “A Day without Feminism.” Web. 17 Oct. 2012.

    In the reading, “A Day Without Feminism”, the authors Boumgoidnei and Richntds want the reader to imagine how life would be “if the women’s movement had never happened” (Boumgoidnei, Richntds.1). The authors’ purpose is to focus the readers mind against women’s rights as if it never happened. The authors give various examples of the changes made if life was still like back in the 1970s. For example, they state that “girls probably take home ec” while “boys take shop or small-engine repair” (Boumgoidnei, Richntds.1). The authors also mention that women have the right to vote but they “vote right along with their husbands, not with their own interests in mind” (Boumgoidnei, Richntds.2). Overall, I believe their intended audience is for both male and female readers. Boumgoidnei and Richntds want to emphasize that women are not sex objects and that women shouldn’t feel compelled to put themselves in that situation and assumes that there is “still a lot left to do” (Boumgoidnei, Richntds.3). Both Boumgoidnei and Richntds point out many details about feminism and makes the reader see how today it is not the same as it was back then in many ways such as: divorce, child labor, high school girls are able to play many sports, etc.

  10. Andrea Watson
    October 18, 2012

    Andrea Watson
    T/Th 9:30am
    (was kind of unsure how to correctly cite this, being that I lacked information.)

    Boumgoidnei, Jennifer and Amy Richntds. “A Day without Feminism.” Web. 17 Oct. 2012.

    In “A Day without Feminism,” Jennifer Baumgertner and Amy Richards, discuss many of the major accomplishments made towards the woman’s rights movements in the last thirty years and put into perspective what life was like for women back in the 1970s (Boumgoidnei, Richntds.) They talk about how even early on children and teens are exposed to gender specific classes in schools “girls probably take home ec; boys take shop or small-engine repair” and how “boys who want to learn how to cook or sew on a button are out of luck, as are girls who want to learn how to fix a car” (Boumgoidnei, Richntds.) Then when these boys and girls become men and women, they are conformed to their gender roles where the women are married to their husbands and practically become their property. Women could not even do such much as “obtain credit wilhout her husband’s signature” (Bougoidnei, Richntds.) Though not likely, if the woman had a job, it was mostly likely as a teacher or possibly as a nurse in for the military (Boumgoidnei, Richntds.) College for women was basically a joke. They could hardly find financial support, and even if they did, they were typically majoring in “teaching, home economics, English,” just to name a few (Boumgoidnei, Richntds.) The thing that they mentioned are not completely new to me, but the facts still make me sick to my stomach. The way that they put this into perspective of what our lives would still be like today really makes you think about what you often take for granted. Boumgoidnei and Richntds conclude in saying, “after thirty years of feminism, the world we inhabit barely resembles the world we were born into. And there’s still a lot left to do,” and after their article, I have to say that I agree (Boumgoidnei, Richntds.)

  11. Elizabeth T.
    October 18, 2012

    Elizabeth Trevino
    Comp II 9:30am
    Baumgardner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism”, Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future”. (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux) 2000: 1-3.

    In 1970 the lives of American women were a lot different from what they are now. Women didn’t have options like they do now. In 1970 if you were in grade school your teacher was a women. If you were a girl you could only play one sport and there was no varsity teams. The classes you took where home ec, learning how to cook and sow. Everything was segregated, boys and girls where separated even by the books they read. Only boys where allowed to get scholarships, girls cant even take major science or math classes. If you were a girl and accidently got pregnant an abortion would cost a lot of money, many low class people would not be able to afford it would have to carry that with them for the rest of their lives. Birth control was hard to obtain, and if was obtain there was high after effects from taking the pill. If you where to go to college you would go to a “girls college” where you would become a teacher or get some kind of care giving degree. There was, and there is still low percent of women who doctors. You cannot obtain credit with out a husbands signature, and women are most likely to vote like their husbands. Wives’ husbands die younger because of the stress they are put through of trying to raise a family. Women cant even decide on their own medical options.
    The goal of this source is to let the reader understand the way life was for girls, teenage girls, young women, women, mothers, grandmothers, etc. in 1970, even after women had the right to vote. Many things had not changed; life was difficult for single mothers.
    “A day with out Feminism” will help support my idea that women have always been suppressed with fewer opportunities than men and has always and will continue to be a struggle.

  12. Sam Guzmn
    October 18, 2012

    Baumgartner, Jennifer; Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism,”
    Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future”
    (New York: Farrer, Straus, and Giroux) 2000: 3-9; 1-3.

    Women have come a long way since the 1970s. In this reading we see just how far things have changed. Here we can see how so many things we don’t make much of can bring something different. For example, back then most teachers were women. Now days you see more and more men taking up teaching. Another thing is how much disrespected women have been. In the reading we see that if a boss asked a women for sexual acts she either had to do it or risk getting fired. We know that cannot happen anymore, but it’s still sad to see that is once use to be that way.

  13. Crystal
    October 18, 2012

    Crystal Solis (T/Th 1pm-2:20)
    Baumgardner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism”, Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future”.(New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux) 2000: 1-3.
    A Day Without Feminism is an article centered around feminism and supported by situations of women’s rights in the 1970’s. Question in addition to situations are stated to captivate the attention of the female audience. The clear purpose of this article is to inform the reader of the changes feminism has brought. For example, the author describes academic, sexual, and personal circumstances in which women had no right to. This source would be a good source for a paper written on the topic of feminism due to the many phrases and keywords that could be used for research.

  14. Joy James
    October 18, 2012

    Baumgardner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism”, Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future”.(New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux) 2000: 1-3.
    “A Day Without Feminism” is an article emphasing the differences in the 1970’s until now in the female society. It highlights that without a husband a woman is nothing, being pretty is a prioriy, not a option; it states that the jobs, available are minute in comparison to males as well as the pay that goes along with it. [a female gets paid a 50 cents an hour, a male gets paid a dollar] It talks about the unequal educational opportunities for women and girls and how the only real potential the educational system saw in women was a home-economics class or sewing or something in reference to housework. A woman that wasn’t a housewife was sort of frowned upon in society and if she worked because she was single or a single mother, she had to look in the “Help Wanted Female” section of the paper. If a woman had a baby at a hospital and the father wasn’t present, the words “illegitimate” was put on the birth certificate. The purpose of the journal was to be an eye-opener to how to appreciate all of the advancements we’ve made thus far and to not stop progressing. [the parts in the aricle that stated “this hasn’t changed”]

  15. Joseph Simmons
    October 18, 2012

    Joseph Simmons T/Th 11
    Baumgartner, Jennifer; Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism,”
    Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future”
    (New York: Farrer, Straus, and Giroux) 2000: 3-9; 1-3.

    The text in its entirety is over many of the changes in women’s rights since the 1970s. Social, political, and even some medical advances are highlighted with emphasis being on the woman herself and how society treated her. i feel it is interesting how this argument is created and puts the reader literally in the shoes of the average woman. situations were discussed and a feeling of sadness, despair, and defeat cover the entire writing with a few glimpses as to what the future (present day) will bring you and how some of these do not even change. I feel that while this does hold many important truths it is also too broad and generalized. Texas for instance has always been an advocate for women as far back as the pre-Civil War era. The best arguments are not the ones that address both sides, but rather the ones that can take enough out of context to squash an opposing view and make them feel wrong for even thinking for a brief instance they can contradict your side of an argument.

  16. Quaticya J
    October 18, 2012

    T-Th:11-12;20
    Bibliography Annotation Citation
    Baumgardner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism.” Web. 17 Oct. 2012.

    “Has feminism changed our lives?”, A Day Without Feminism, questioned. This article goes back to the 1970’s, were both Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards, sit and have a memorable flash backs of how time for women once were. Men were always allowed to do much more than women, and just oversee the fact that as women they too qualify some male techniques. Education was one a huge conflict when male and female was brought about, “even when girls get better grades than their male counterparts, they are half likely to qualify”, for a scholarship which clearly shows that favoritism is shown toward boys that is in education. Although education was a factor other things were well involved such as unequal wages, the role of a woman, ability to express you, and the list carries on. This article explains that several things we as women today was nothing like it was before the women’s movement. It questions the impact that feminism have put on today’s society, and the open topics of being a women.

  17. Mary Buck
    October 18, 2012

    Mary Buck
    T/Th 9:30 am

    Baumgartner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism,” Manifesta:
    Young Women, Feminism, and the Future” (New York: Farrer, Straus, and
    Giroux) 2000: 3-9; 1-3.

    In this article both Baumgartner and Richards presented the social, political, economic and cultural changes. The life before feminism and after feminism movement had changed America. Feminism had opened doors to women in an imaginable way that women thought would ever happen. Harvard and West Point open their educational system to women. Military accommodated women soldiers. Changes were made in making birth certificates for babies outside wedlock. Children’s activities were integrated rather than having a specific activity only for boys or only for girls. Kitchen equipments were properly named rather than calling it with a nickname, such as “Miss America” for Whirlpool Gas Stove. Women can now freely go to the restaurants without male escort. They also have access to birth control pills. In short, feminism movement made women’s life less restricted and more enjoyable.

    I enjoyed reading this article. The article was written from the point of view of the second source but the information they provided is very explicit. There are various comparisons of before and after scenarios of feminist movement. It allows the reader to visualize the changes from 1970’s to the recent days. Feminism had not only changed things in political aspect but also in culture, economy and social acceptance of women. This article will be a good source for those who will have Feminism Movement as their topic.

  18. Amy Krigsman
    October 18, 2012

    Amy Krigsman (11:00)

    Baumgartner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism.” Web. 17 Oct. 2012.

    In their article “A Day Without Feminism,” Boumgoidnei and Richntds start off with a bit of their own awareness and what their households were like as they grew up in the 1970s. They go on to ask questions pertaining to feminism in today’s society and seek to expose how different life today would be had the women’s movement never occurred. The authors invite the audience to imagine they were in the United States in the year of their birth and continue describing women’s day to day lives in the 1970s, every now and then interjecting with things that are still true today.

  19. Leticia
    October 18, 2012

    Leticia Gallegos (9:30)

    Baumgartner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism.” Web. 17 Oct. 2012.

    In “A day without feminism,” the authors take the reader back in time about 40 years ago during a time where women had absolutely no rights because feminist movements had not occurred yet. At the same time Baumgartner and Richards cleverly bring the past into the present by discussing (in great detail) some of the injustices women were forced to live with. They begin by discussing what the world would be like throughout the lifetime of a woman beginning from birth and ending at old age. If a child was born to a mother that does not list a father, the child’s birth certificate would be labeled “illegitimate” because a child is supposed to take the fathers last name (Baumgartner, Richards 1).
    If the mother of the child was one of the few rare single parents working to maintain a living, daycares would almost be impossible to find because women were meant to be the prime caregivers not the financial supporters. If the child was a girl then she would attend an elementary school with only female teachers because men were not allowed to teach students under the sixth grade. She would not be allowed to play in Little Leagues or participate in any other sport other than cheerleading and she would not take calculus or physics because those were courses meant for males.
    She would grow up thinking that sex was only meant to be pleasurable for the man and that she should avoid sex before marriage, otherwise, no man would want her as a wife. Later she would learn that becoming pregnant if sexually active would only be her fault because she would “get herself pregnant” (Baumgartner, Richards 1). Unplanned pregnancies could only be avoided by taking life threatening birth control that she was not made aware of before taking because abortions were illegal.
    If she wanted to go to “girl’s schools” (Baumgartner, Richards 2) after high school the biggest scholarship she could ever get is the Miss America Pageant Scholarship and she cannot even apply to schools like Harvard or West Point.
    If she chose to work after high school some jobs would have rules that said that she had to wear makeup, and if she exceeded a certain weight and age that were deemed “sexy.” she would be fired. Likewise, if she got herself pregnant then she would be fired as well. If her male boss wanted to sexually harass her then there was nothing she could do but do whatever her boss wanted or quit her job.
    If she wasn’t married then whenever she would go to restaurants they would refuse to attend her because she was not accompanied by a male escort. If she did get married, and had an abusive husband she would have no choice but to live with the abuse because there would be no laws that protect women against abuse (Baumgartner, Richards 2). In her late adulthood her late husband’s social security would be worth more than hers because he would have accumulated more income (Baumgartner, Richards 3).
    Overall, the reading was very informative. The way the authors wrote this article made it seem like something very personal because this was the time they were born into. It is now clear to me how significant feminist movements are. The America the authors talked about seems like a different country compared to the America we are living in now. The authors make good points about the significance of feminist movements and that feminism still has a long way to go.

  20. Catherine
    October 18, 2012

    Catherine MacGregor (9:30)

    Baumgardner, Jennifer, and Amy Richards. Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000. Print.

    Jennifer Boumgoidnei and Amy Richards present an article that poses the question, “is feminism dead?” and asks what women’s lives would be like in present times if the movement had never existed (1). It goes on to illustrate examples of women’s lives in the 1970’s and the hardships they endured. Though Young Women, Feminism, and the Future mentions issues such as domestic abuse and differences in education and wages, it spends an exorbitant amount of time discussing sex. How women were taught to view sex and how their lives changed because of sex. The article also speaks about how husbands were more likely to die first in a marriage. It attributes the cause to stress because of a repressed emotional life and having to support a family (3).
    Though the article references other credible sources, it does not always use information from them, such as mentioning the EEOC without providing any concrete data. It also fails to answer the initial questions presented. The beginning two paragraphs lead the reader to believe that the article will link the past to the present in an intriguing way, by showing how current times would have been affected if the feminist movement had never existed. Unfortunately, the rest of the article only discussed circumstances from the past. It implies that nothing in life would have changed from the early 1970’s. It does not take into account other variables like technological advances. Instead it resorts to scare tactics by presenting examples from a terrible time for women. Finally, the use of words such as “crappy” and “canned” projects the article towards a less academic audience (Boumgoidnei, Richards 1-2). Overall, the article does not seem extremely credible or educational.

  21. Norma Ibarra
    October 18, 2012

    Norma Ibarram 9:30
    “A day without feminism” by Jennifer Boumgoidnei and Amy Richntds
    Annotation
    Baumgarnder, Jennifer and Richntds “A day without feminism” Web. 17 Oct. 2012.

    In this paper it talks about how things are for women years ago and how they are treated and how they have to do certain things to keep their job. It talks about how school for a lot of women is hard to grasp because it is expensive and that there is only scholarships for men really. It also describes a women life if she is divorced and how people will look at her as. Even at a womens job they might be forced to do demeaning things just so they can keep their job. It describes as well what girls are suppose to think and do and how there are certain things expected of them.
    I think that it was smart how they talked about everything because they talk about work, school, and the home. This way the reader better understands and get a better picture of a life of a women back then. And they can reflect and compare from now and then and see the differences that there is. And it mentions real institutions that are still open and running today that is hard to imagine that they once had this mentality for women.
    I think that now that women are allowed to do more things is really great and that we do not live in a world with rules and abuse like that for women. I think that it was terrbible that women would not be allowed to keep their job if they had baby’s. It makes me appreciate things more and makes me reflect on my own life today and make me wonder what my life would have been if I lived back then. Even though it was terrible how things where back then I liked learning about it to understand what women had to go through to get to where women are today.

  22. kyla hunt
    October 18, 2012

    Kyla Hunt (T/TH 11:00)
    Baumgardner, Jennifer, and Amy Richards. Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000. Print.

    The article “A Day without Feminism” is a really interesting reading because the authors are trying to make a point of how life was before the feminist movement started. They give many examples concerning sports, education, jobs, and marriage life, pregnancy. Women were basically an item; they were not supposed to do anything out of the norm. Their husbands or males in general were authority; you do as you were told. Women received little to no respect during this time period, they were often walked on and forced to do things they did not want to do. For example “If a boss demands sex, refers to his female employee exclusively as “Baby,” or says he won’t pay her unless she gives him a blow job, she has to either quit or succumb”. Overall I enjoyed this read it opened my eyes to how far we women have come in society.

  23. ricardo vargas
    October 18, 2012

    ricardo vargas 9:30

    Baumgartner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism.” Web. 17 Oct. 2012

    In “A Day without Feminism” Boumgoidnei and Richntds both established their credibility and being able to relating to what they were writing about because they lived it. By saying “imagine its still 1970…..” the author wants you to visualize what women had to go through (Richards). In a way leading to how the women should be more appreciative about the rights they have now, because they didn’t has as much as a choice when they grew up as opposed to today’s society. By comparing the news articles from the seventy’s to today the author’s convey their point in an example that is easy for anyone to understand and appeals to the reader. The article is informative because the authors want to tell how feminism wasn’t like it is today in the seventy’s and how today’s youth should be more appreciate of the advances of feminist movements.

  24. Lisa Timulty
    October 18, 2012

    Baumgartner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism,” Manifesta:Young Women, Feminism, and the Future” (New York: Farrer, Straus, and Giroux) 2000: 3-9.

    The article starts off with a ruse. They pose the question “Is feminism dead?” and then never answer it. Instead, they give a very slanted glimpse of what life was like before feminism. They go on to discuss what a typical day in the life of a woman was like in the 1970’s and what is was like to be female. They state several generic ideas such as “it may be against the law for a male to teach grades lower than the sixth grade, on the basis that it’s unnatural, or that men can’t be trusted with young children”(P4), Girls and young woman might have sex while they are unmarried, by they may be ruining their chances of landing a guy full time”(P8), these ideas turn me off and just make me wonder about the credibility of these authors. Where are they getting this information and why are they making this assumption these ideas are factual?
    I found myself disagreeing with most the author’s points, including the assertion that “Babies born on this day are automatically given their father’s name. And if no father is listed, “illegitimate” is likely typed on the birth certificate (P4). I was a child born in the 70’s with no father listed on my birth certificate and nowhere on it does it say that I am illegitimate. This is another point that seriously impacts the author’s credibility. I would not use this article due to the lack of facts and statistics. The authors just throw around their opinions and views of what it was like to live in the 70’s. Also, they never answer any criticism about feminism.

  25. Hezron Abu
    October 18, 2012

    T,Th 1-2:20 Pm

    Annotation of “A Day Without Feminism”

    Boumgoidnei, Jennifer, and Richntds, Amy. “A Day Without Feminism.” Pioneerpens. Pioneerpens, n.d. Web. 16 Oct. 2012. Available http://pioneerpens.pbworks.com/w/file/59845947/a_day_without_feminism.pdf.

    Authors Jennifer, and Amy, raise the question, “what if the feminist movement never occurred?” The article gives multiple examples of how people lived in the 1970’s for reference to how things were before the women’s movement. The authors give examples of a host of problems, from lack of equal pay for women in comparison to men, to a lack of input a woman had on her own body. The authors even show disadvantages some men had due to a lack of freedoms by women, such as a high divorce rate, and a lower life expectancy for men.

  26. Sukbae An
    October 18, 2012

    Boumgoidnei, Jennifer and Richntds, Amy. “A Day without Feminism.” Web. 18 Oct. 2012.

    The article, “A Day Without Feminism” is basically summed up by what women were allowed to do professionally during this time as well as how they were viewed through the eyes of society and what was expected of them. It emphasizes the great disadvantages that women have gone to improve conditions around family life, the work place, the dynamics of relationships, and just general human rights. The authors drew on ethics as well, assuming that a majority of women will read the article, so the information is so shocking to us that it appears especially unethical and unimaginable. While reading this article I also noticed that some of the points the authors had brought up as issues in 1970 are issues still today. “If a girl “gets herself pregnant,” she loses her membership in the National Honor Society (which is still true today) and is expelled” (Boumgoidnei Richntds). I thought the authors were very effective in demonstrating how feminism continues to be an important and necessary movement in today’s society.

  27. Shasity Torres
    October 18, 2012

    (11:00 a.m.)
    Boumgoidnei, Jennifer, and Amy Richntds. “A Day Without Feminism.” Web. 18 Oct. 2012.
    The authors begin the selection by taking the reader back to 1970, when women’s rights were still very limited. They give several examples of how women were undermined in things such as education, marriage, and working. Although these points were something I had heard about in the past, there were several facts I had not been informed off. For example if a baby was born with no father, then the baby would be listed as “illegitimate” on the birth certificate (Boumgoidnei and Richntds 1). After having read I don’t know how I could have survived during that time period. This is definitely something I can write about. Another surprising fact was the way women were treated while giving birth. In the selection it says, “they [were] strapped down and lying down, made to have the baby against gravity for the doctors convenience” (Boumgoidnei and Richntds 3). This automatically made me think of how they use to treat people with psychotic breakdowns. It’s quite amazing to know that none of these were unlawful, and it wasn’t until women took a stand that they stopped doing such things. If women wouldn’t have said anything we’d probably still be doing the same things. Society has truly changed in a matter of years.

  28. nitzia mcelrath
    October 18, 2012

    Nitzia McElrath
    A day Without Feminist

    FEMINISM AND THE DECADE OF BEHAVIOR. .Authors: White, Jacquelyn W.
    Russo, Nancy Felipe

    Travis, Cheryl Brown,
    Source: Psychology of Women Quarterly; Dec2001, Vol. 25 Issue 4, p267, 13p.Document Type: Article.Subject Terms:*FEMINISM

    *FEMINIST psychology
    *FEMINIST theory

    *FEMINIST literature, abstract: Argues that the goals of the Decade of Behavior cannot be achieved without contributions from feminist psychology, as discussed in vol. 25 no. 4 issue of the “Psychology of Women Quarterly” journal. Challenge posed by gender issues to the goals of the Decade of Behavior; Importance of developing research models in the context of feminist principles; Necessity of expanding the range of research methodologies in feminism. .ISSN: 03616843.Accession Number: 5995473.Database: Academic Search Complete. Publisher Logo:

    I think my reflection the “Psychology of Women Quarterly,” journal is helpful to researchers, educators, and policymakers in working to achieve the goals of the Decade of Behavior. They have a lot questions to answer about behavior and social research within Decade domains to help to understand without contributions from feminist psychology. They challenges are Inclusiveness and Diversity, Context, Power and Privilege, and Activism.
    The goal is to:

    • Improving health
    • Increasing safety
    • Improving education
    • Increasing prosperity
    • Promoting democracy

    I think the goals of the decade of behavior without contributions from feminist psychology will challenge today to improve our society and expanded more decade. My opinion without contribution from feminist psychology will be no balance in our society, because we contribute an important life, mentally, intelligent, social, verbally, education, parenting, and love.

  29. Cecilia Frias
    October 18, 2012

    Cecilia Frias
    T/Th 11am
    Baumgartner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism,” Manifesta:
Young Women, Feminism, and the Future” (New York: Farrer, Straus, and
Giroux) 2000: 3-9; 1-3.

    Boumgoidnei’s and Richntds’s “A Day Without Feminism,” article is mainly about how life would be if feminism never happened. Some of the stuff they point out is still happening, “ if a girl ‘gets herself pregnant,’ she loses her membership in the National Honor Society (which is still true today) and is expelled. Their examples are based on their past experiences back in the 70’s. Women were treated more like an object than a human being. Because the article was mostly based on their opinions it does not seem credible but it makes the reader think back and be thankful for the changes that have been made since the.

  30. Amy Summers
    October 18, 2012

    Baumgardner, Jennifer, and Amy Richards. “A Day Without Feminism.” Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000.
    This excerpt is a glimpse into life without feminism. 40 years ago women had to deal with discrimination in the workforce and the military. They were unable to obtain credit without her husband’s approval. They are constantly with men, because without men they might not be able to eat a meal in a restaurant or even rent an apartment. The article provides the reader with a small amount of the crazy that was America 40 years ago. The source is helpful because it provides a large amount of information and examples in a small piece of a larger book. It’s encouraging women today to be thankful and realize how times have changed for the better. The source was helpful to me because it could be easily integrated into a paper and give the paper a sarcastic and amusing tone.

  31. Debra Bagley
    October 18, 2012

    Debra Bagley
    A Day Without Feminism
    Authors: Jennifer Boumgoidnei and Amy Richntds.
    The history of the women’s movement from 1970’s until present has shown that effective changes for women today have been made, but women and men have more work to do.

    Thirty years ago women were not opened to reading sex materials about masturbation. Bourmgoidnei and Richntds states, in the 1970’s no one read “much about masturbation as a natural activity”. In this document it explains that women and men were not knowledgeable as they are today about the clitoris and the female organism. The author’s claim, it is unlikely that women or their male partners know much about clitoris and its role in organism (Bourmgoidnei and Richntds).

  32. Cierra Jones
    October 18, 2012

    Cierra Jones T-TH 1
    Annotated Bibliography
    A Day without Feminism
    Baumgardner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism”, Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future”. (New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux) 2000: 1-3

    In the reading A Day without Feminism, the readers want us to “imagine what our lives would
    have been if the women’s movement had never happened” (Baumgardner, Jennifer, and Amy Richards). I learned so much reading this article that I never would have known such as girls not only having a basketball team and no varsity sports in high school, if a female was in NHS (National Honors Society) and got pregnant, she will lose her membership, if a female got pregnant and wanted an abortion, there were only few places she could go such as New York, Cuba, London or Scandinavia, but only if you had enough money to fly there. They also tell us “Women workers can be fired or demoted for being pregnant, especially if they are teachers, since the kids they teach aren’t supposed to think that women have sex. If a boss demands sex, refers to his female employee exclusively as “Baby,” or says he won’t pay her unless she gives him a blow job, she has to either quit or succumb—no pun intended.” (Baumgardner, Jennifer, and Amy Richards). I hate the fact that a woman cannot really do anything if a boss demands sex. She only has two options and that is to either quit or succumb. A woman should be able to say something and not get in trouble or judged by society for saying something like this. Reading some of the things in this article I must say did upset me and I am happy we had such women that went through the Women’s Movement because if we did not, I along with many other women would not have the chances to do a lot of the things we are able to do today. I will say the few sentences the authors left us with such as Has feminism changed our lives? Was it necessary? After thirty years of feminism, the world we inhabit barely resembles the world we were born into. And there’s still a lot left to do” (Baumgardner, Jennifer, and Amy Richards), still leaves me with some questions.

  33. Tochukwu Tiko-Okoye
    October 18, 2012

    T/Th 1:00PM

    Boumgoidnei, Jennifer and Amy Richntds. “A Day Without Feminism.” Web. 18 Oct. 2012.

    The authors wonder if feminism is dead, stating that feminism not only changed the lives of women, but also the lives of men. The readers are told to “imagine that for a day, it’s still 1970.” During those times, women did not have the priviledge of participating in many activities we deem “manly.” The only job a woman was supposed to do was being a wife and a mother. They could not join certain groups or take certain classes because of the mere fact that they were women. Masturbation was unacceptable, women were not to have sex until they were married, and if a woman was divorced, she was deemed a “family disgrace or an easy sexual prey.” Less than 50% of women worked outside of the home and those who did only made fifty-two cents to every dollar a man made. The author makes a point that had the women’s movement not occured, women might have still been in the same positions they were in, in 1970.
    I feel as though the goal of this document was enlighten readers about feminism. Although it was written based on the author’s opinion, it does hold truth. The facts that were given such as the employment rate and pay helped show logos in their work.
    This piece did not help me change my topic, in fact I agree with the two authors. The women’s movement did make a way for everything women are able to do now. There is still more work to be done but at least it’s not like it used to be, i.e. in 1970.

  34. Carol Frickle
    October 18, 2012

    Baumgardner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism”, Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future”.(New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux) 2000: 1-3.

    “A Day Without Feminism” does well to point out different scenarios that we might take for granted in today’s day and age. There are several comparisons of what is and what used to be which would be in order to show that we should indeed be thankful for what this movement has done for us. The two authors did good to compare their lives growing up which was meant to show the reader that even from different backgrounds they came to the same conclusion about women’s rights and feminism. The intended audience here is young women, the intention is to show them where our rights came from. This is a good article for a paper on feminism or even just a compare and contrast of what could happen without feminism.

  35. Matt Simpson
    October 18, 2012

    Matt Simpson T/R 1:00pm-2:20pm
    Sources:The given text.
    Boumgoidnei, Jennifer. Richntds, Amy. ‘A Day Without Feminism’. [1-3] Web. Oct 18, 2012.

    The article is a giant list of facts about the lives of women back in the 1970’s and the rights that women had back then. Mainly the article included many random facts about all of the things women had to do and what they could not do in the 1970’s. Such as how they had ” Take Back the Night marches to protest rape and violence against women, but not many join them because college girls aren’t allowed out much after dark.” [3]. They weren’t even allowed out after dark to attend the protests against rape because they were afraid of being raped! That is how intensely held back women were in the 1970’s. I think the source is a useful source for different kinds of writings. I say this because it is entirely random facts all added one together. If you were wanting to add a random fact here or there for your paper then it would be a good source. For me, this source may be helpful when adding random facts. The text holds good controversary, and controversary is what gets the emotions of the reader flowing so they can relate to the author.

  36. Sarah Carlisle
    October 18, 2012

    Sarah Carlisle
    T/TH 1:00

    Boumgoidnei, Jennifer and Amy Richntds. “A Day Without Feminism.” Web. 18 Oct. 2012.

    In the article “A Day Without Feminism,” the authors, Jennifer Boumgoidnei and Amy Richntds, pose the question “Has feminism changed our lives?” (Boumgoidnei and Richntds 3). By using both historical and personal examples, the authors portray how the feminist movement affected the lives of both men and women, and what the world would be like if the movement had never occurred. The article beings with background information about Boumgoidnei and Richntds, which effectively connects their personal lives with the women’s movement, thus establishing credibility with the audience. “Both of our mothers went to consciousness-raising-type groups. Amy’s mother raised Amy on her own, and Jennifer’s mother, questioning the politics of housework, staged laundry strikes” (Boumgoidnei and Richntds 1). Through analyzing the status of women in the year 1970, the authors have brought the audience into a world where women are stereotyped, segregated, and deprived of basic rights. By exploring all aspects of the society–social, economic, and political, the authors create a comprehensive view of this society. The use of statistics, or logos, and emotional appeals, or ethos, also aid in their argument. By comparing the conditions exemplified in the article to modern conditions, the authors purpose is to make it clear that “there is still a lot let to do” when it comes to women’s rights (Boumgoidnei and Richntds 3).
    I think this article would be a very informational source if studying the feminist movement. The authors used a variety of examples to provide evidence for their agreement, and because of the variety of facts embedded in it, the source could be used for many different topics regarding women.

  37. Kaitlyn Oja
    October 18, 2012

    The authors of this article are two women, Jennifer Baumgartner and Amy Richards. They talk about how different women’s lives were in the past as compared to now. Some of the examples they use seem pretty unfair and shocking. “Women workers can be fired or demoted for being
    pregnant, especially if they are teachers, since the kids they teach aren’t supposed to think that women have sex. If a boss demands sex, refers to
    his female employee exclusively as “Baby,” or says he won’t pay her unless she gives him a blow job, she has to either quit or succumb—no pun intended” (Baumgartner, Richards 2). The tone of the article is evident in this quote. It is slightly humorous and sarcastic which catches you off guard because of the radical statements they are making. It shows that they are angry and put off by how women were treated without a feminism movement. One thing I wonder though is where the authors are getting their information and statistics.
    “Less than 2 percent of dentists are women; 100 percent of dental assistants are women. The “glass ceiling” that keeps women from moving naturally up the ranks, as well as the sticky floor that keeps them unnaturally down in low-wage work, has not been named, much less challenged” (Baumgartner, Richards 2). This is a statistic that could use some sources or proof. It makes me think most of what they are saying could possibly not be as accurate as we think.

    • Kaitlyn Oja
      October 18, 2012

      “A Day without Feminism”

      Baumgardner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. “A Day without Feminism”, Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future”.(New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux) 2000: 1-3.

  38. dguebert@twu.edu
    October 18, 2012

    Baumgardner, Jennifer, and Amy Richards. “Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future.” Google Books. Macmillian, 2000. Web. 17 Oct. 2012

    Baumgardner and Richards show that feminism is an important part of history in thier own opinion. In the initial paragraph of “Manifesta..” the two women give the reader a challenge in a sense saying “Do we need new strategies? Is feminism dead? Has society changed so much that the idea of a feminist movement is obsolete?” provoking the idea that the reader and the generation should try and promote and follow feminism.

    going into the actual article the authors give a back story in their life. Describing when they grew up and how it was growing up alongside their mothers being participants in the movements of the time. Also describing how in their teenage years describing how sports like soccer, track, and any varsity sport was not available to girls. Classes were also not offered to girls. “In junior high, girls probably take home ec; boys take shop or small-engine repair.” (Baumgardner, Richards).

    i read the rest of this but the beginning is all i could really think about throughout the whole article. it made me think about the difference in today and the 1970’s.

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